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How is marijuana possession penalized in North Carolina?

The North Carolina Controlled Substances Act describes how marijuana is considered to be a Schedule VI substance in the state. Although the possession of this illicit drug isn’t punished as seriously as more addictive ones such as heroin or cocaine, conviction is possible. This is especially the case if you’re found guilty of selling or trafficking marijuana.

Possession

Individuals who are found to be in possession of less than 0.5 ounces of marijuana are likely to be charged with a misdemeanor and fined $200.

Those who possess between 0.5 and 1.5 ounces can be sentenced to anywhere between one and 45 days in jail. They may also be assessed up to $1,000 in fines.

Anyone who is found to be in possession of between 1.5 ounces and 10 pounds of the drug may be imprisoned for between three to eight months and also have to pay $1,000 fine.

Sale

An individual who is caught selling more than five grams of marijuana is likely to be charged with a Class I felony. Anyone who sells less than that won’t be though.

Trafficking

Anyone is arrested for trafficking between 10 and 50 pounds of the drug may be charged with a Class H felony. If they’re convicted of such a crime, then they could face as long as 30 months in prison and be assessed up to $5,000 in fines.

Someone arrested for trafficking between 50 and 2,000 pounds of the drug will be charged with a Class G felony. If convicted, they’ll be fined as much as $25,000 and be required to spend up to 42 months in jail.

Individuals arrested for trafficking between 2,000 and 10,000 pounds of marijuana will be charged with a Class F felony and, if convicted, be sentenced up to 84 months in prison. They may be also assessed as much as $50,000 in fines.

Anyone who traffics over 10,000 pounds of marijuana will be charged with a Class D felony. A conviction may result in a prison sentence of up to 219 months. A defendant may also be assessed as much as $200,000 in fines.

Individuals in Bolivia who are charged with drug offenses, even simple possession, can put their freedom, job, schooling, and other aspects of their lives at risk. A criminal defense attorney can help you come up with a custom-tailored strategy to help you avoid a conviction on a drug charge.