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A Leading, Award-Winning Law Firm In North Carolina

Providing Strong Defense And Representation

What happens if I get a DUI in another state?

If you are on vacation in another state and you receive a DUI charge, what happens to you when you get home?

Unfortunately, the charge won’t just disappear. Non-residents of a state are still subject to that state’s DUI laws, and the penalties are likely to follow them back to their home state.

How states communicate

Most states are a part of the Intestate Driver License Compact (IDLC). This is an agreement between states to share information about driving records for every driver in the country. Only Georgia, Tennessee, Massachusetts, Michigan, and Wyoming are not a part of the IDLC.

Under this agreement, if another state finds you guilty of a DUI, your home state would enforce the penalties.

However, even if your state is not a part of the IDLC, your license may still be suspendedThe National Driver Register is an administration that maintains a database of all license suspensions in the nation. Thus, if your license is suspended, that suspension would likely still apply in your home state.

Will I have to return to the state?

Unfortunately, in most cases, you will have to return to the state for court dates. However, for certain procedures, you may be able to have your attorney act as your surrogate. This can help you avoid any extra costs for transportation and housing associated with returning to the state for court.

Dealing with an out of state DUI

If you are dealing with a non-resident DUI charge you should contact a lawyer practicing in the state as soon as possible. Because of the situation, they can advise you on how to best proceed with your case.